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August 17, 2017
TCSOA Board of Directors
2017
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Christina Dail
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Nate Gillespie
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Audrey Segura
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Darnell Dail
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Wisconsin Governor Slashes Budget; Forces Government Employees To Pay More To Pensions And For Benefits
Updated On: Mar 19, 2011

In case you have not been following the news lately, the Governor of Wisconsin unveiled his plan to reduce benefits paid to government workers in the form of requiring them to pay more into their pensions and more for their benefits.  The Governor stirred national debate approximately 3 weeks ago when he announced his intent to cut funding for schools and public service.

Despite protests from thousands of citizens and union members, Walker outlined his plan in the article below.  There is no doubt this trend will not only affect public service in Wisconsin, Walker's plan is a threat to every union and public service agency nationwide.  It is a direct attack on pensions, retirement and education. 

Walker is not in favor of working with unions despite contracts that are already in place.  He has proposed eliminating collective bargining rights of union workers. 

Evethough we are facing budget shortfalls nationwide, we have to fight to preserve our rights as government employees.  Get active, stay informed and make your voice count.  See what others are doing, check out the IAFF and News Feed tabs.

The following article was taken from the AP/The Huffington Post.  Author Scott Bauer 

MADISON, Wis. — After focusing for weeks on his proposal to strip public employees of collective bargaining rights, Gov. Scott Walker on Tuesday presented his full budget – a plan that cuts $1.5 billion in aid to public schools and local government but avoids any tax or fee increases, furloughs or widespread layoffs.

Walker said the cuts could be paid for in large part by forcing government employees to pay more for their pension and health care benefits. And the governor whose cost-cutting ideas have stirred a national debate over public-sector unions gave no indication he would soften his demand to reduce their power at the negotiating table.

"This is a reform budget," Walker told lawmakers inside the Assembly chamber as protesters on the floor below screamed, banged on drums and blew horns. "It is about getting Wisconsin working again, and to make that happen, we need a balanced budget that works – and an environment where the private sector can create 250,000 jobs over the next four years."

Walker's legislation has drawn tens of thousands of demonstrators to the Capitol over the last three weeks, and tensions were still evident when Walker outlined the budget during a joint session of the Legislature convened under heavy security. Assembly Democrats refused to stand and greet the governor as he arrived to speak.

"It feels like we're announcing a going-out-of-business sale," said state Rep. Cory Mason, a Democrat from Racine who criticized Walker's proposed cuts to education.

Walker's budget places "the entire burden of Wisconsin's budget shortfall on our children, our most vulnerable citizens in need of health care and long-term care, and our dedicated public employees," said Robert Kraig, director of the consumer advocacy group Citizen Action of Wisconsin.

Doing so is Walker's "own value choice, not an economic necessity forced on him by others," Kraig said.

The governor released his two-year budget in part to support his argument that public-worker concessions are essential to confront a projected $3.6 billion shortfall. His proposal to eliminate most collective bargaining remains in limbo after Senate Democrats fled the state to prevent a vote.

Wisconsin "cannot grow if our people are weighed down paying for a larger and larger government, a government that pays its workers unsustainable benefits that are out of line with the private sector," he said. "We need a leaner and cleaner state government."

 


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End Domestic Violence

TCSOA Place 2 Officer Tobias supporting the "End Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault" Campaign

Employee of the Year

TCOSA PAC Chair D. Dail accepting the "Officer of the Year" award at the CLEAT Conference on behalf of TCSOA President C. Dail.  Pictured on the left is CLEAT represetative Lt. J. Hodge.

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